Prom dress sale helps curb costs

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Prom dress sale helps curb costs

Benjamin Van Setters, Reporter

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Prom can be one of the most celebratory and exciting nights of almost anyone’s teenage years; however, this additionally translates to one of the most expensive. A 2015 survey by Visa showed that the average American Teenager spends roughly $919 on Prom overall, pertaining to their outfit, hair, makeup, transportation and flowers—each accumulating a truly hefty expense on their own.

  This expense is not easily manageable, seeing as many teenagers don’t have the hundreds of dollars necessary even for a dress. And although this might bring down one of the biggest nights of high school, the DC Everest Junior Class has found a way to bring it up to an affordable, fun time.

  Miss Gipp, a computer science teacher at DC Everest and the organizer for the event, commented on her understanding about the creation of the fundraiser.

  “We talked about how some girls don’t have the money to spend hundreds of dollars on prom dresses.” She added, “I had known some people at other schools who had run a prom dress consignment sale before, and it had worked out well for them.”

  After advertising for the sale, the committee had received well over 280 dress to contribute to the fundraiser, holding lasting success through its outcome.

  “While I would have liked to see more dresses sold, I think that the amount of help we were able to get really made it worth it,” said Gipp. Even though the committee had expectations for higher sales, they ended satisfied with the resolution of the fundraiser.

  In fact, not all of the beneficiaries were high school students, but all proceeds went to the Women’s Community, an organization meant to help survivors or targets of domestic abuse and sexual violence.

  “They were so happy about it,” said Gipp, “I called them and they were very thankful, It’s been amazing to be able to help them in the way that we did.”

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