Seuss Stories Brought to Life

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The boy scouts in Seussical sing and dance

The boy scouts in Seussical sing and dance

The boy scouts in Seussical sing and dance

Samantha Baltzell, Production Manager

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Lights, camera, action! Suddenly the lights go dim and the audience falls quiet. The cast runs on to the stage singing a song for the introduction. They run off the sides and then Miriam Peters, Junior, or the “Cat in the Hat,” steps out of a closet to begin the show. The audience applauds for the cast and cheers in anticipation.

The D.C. Everest Senior High Drama Department performed the “Seussical” from Nov. 9 to Nov. 11 with shows at 1:00, 6:30, and 7:00 over the span of the four days. The production was very well put together, funny, and worth seeing. “Seussical” was broadcasted by Mrs. Wendy Vesper, learning disabilities teacher.

“The staff throws out ideas and once we have an idea then we take it to the finance director and the principal and have them approve it,” said Mrs. Vesper. “Finally, we talk to the rest of the staff to make sure they’re willing and then we go from there.”

Auditions are typically intense to make sure that the right people are chosen for the right characters, but with “Seussical” everyone had a role. Auditioners typically have to sing a song, act out a monologue, and dance in order to gain a role, but this wasn’t the case with “Seussical”.

“Everyone still has to sing and everyone has to act. People didn’t always have to dance in this one because the dance we wanted to do we knew they could handle,” said Mrs. Vesper. “This is the first time we’ve ever had everyone audition and make it. We knew we wanted a big cast for the certain groups like The Jungle and the Whos. A lot of parts are very different so it’s hard to have them play more than one character.”

The show had multiple twists and turns. Using blacklights, the producers brought different creatures to life and even created a very interesting scene with white masks and gloves that held up signs to help the main character go home.

The most interesting part about the casting was that the soccer team was actually recruited by Mrs. Vesper to help out with the Cadet portion of the play.

“I was surprised at how willing they were. They brought this wonderful energy with them,” said Mrs. Vesper. “They were really enthusiastic, which is great because that’s the type of energy we needed.”

Lily Bliven, Junior, played the role of a Jungle Citizen. She worked countless hours right alongside the whole cast and crew to help put this production together.

Bliven said she enjoyed participating in the ensemble. “Being in the ensemble, you kind of get to pick your character,” said Bliven. “You pick how you react to the leads which is really nice.”

The acting of the ensemble and the main characters was almost flawless. There were incidents where things didn’t go as planned, but in the end it turned out amazing. In fact, the mistakes were funny. Mrs. Vesper said a helicopter that was supposed to fly to the front of the stage and back crashed into a curtain instead. Miriam Peters was acting at that point and recovered with no issues at all.

“We had talked about what we were going to do if something like that happened,” said Mrs. Vesper. “You take those risks to make those special surprises. When the helicopter crashed she played it off perfectly.

The cutest part of the play was the very end when the egg that Horton was watching hatched. Two little children popped out and had the whole audience in awe.

“You need to have an elephant bird. It’s in the script,” said Mrs. Vesper. “Usually people use children in that role. I was hoping someone had a younger brother or sister, and Lucas Tobalsky just happened to have both.”

At the very end of the performance, tears were flowing and hugs were given. The amount of unity in the room was very powerful.

“It’s a theater thing to get emotional. Drama becomes your family,” said Ally Raczkowski, Senior. “For me it’s my last show, but for some seniors, this is their first musical and their last.”

While it may have been an emotional ending, it was very rewarding to see the reaction from the audience said Bliven and Raczkowski.

“There’s so much that has to be done behind the scene and I don’t think enough people realize that. It’s a lot more than just going up and singing,” said Mrs. Vesper. “There’s so much preparation that comes into producing something like this. Working around 88 different schedules is very difficult. It’s exhausting, but at the end it becomes very exhilarating.”

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