Triumphs, Struggles with Growth Deficiency

Logan Grzy

Logan Grzy


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The saying “Eat your veggies to grow big and strong” has been around for a very long time. Students are drilled about eating healthy from the day they start school to the day they die. Vegetables, fruits, meats, and dairy are the main groups that are really pushed onto children, but what if that never made a difference?

Logan Grzywacz, D.C. Everest Senior High School Senior, has with a deficiency called the Growth Hormone Deficiency, or GHD. This deficiency causes people to grow slower than normal.

“Average kids grow two to two and a half inches per year and I only grow one and a half to two inches per year. Right now my high, five feet two inches, is supposed to be where I stop growing,” said Logan.

Despite that fact, Logan is in disbelief.

“I’m pretty sure I’m going to grow a little bit more because my body has managed to really surprise doctors,” said Grzywacz. “I’m already growing more than they expected me to.”

Growing up, Logan had to have his first surgery at five years old and have two more after that. He also was given shots regularly in order to push for a certain protein that helps people grow, but could no longer take them due to price.

While children are born with this deficiency, it does not affecting them until around two or three years old. While GHD does affect height, it affects mental health too.

“Sometimes I have thoughts that little kids would have because my brain isn’t growing. It’s almost like I have autism, but I don’t,” said Grzywacz. “I have to learn slower. I also have to do a lot more hands on learning. That’s why I like to do group learning since it helps me out a lot. With lecturing, a lot of times, teachers go through so fast that I don’t even know what I’m doing.”   

Just before the school year begins, Logan sends a presentation to all his teachers so they’re aware of his disability. That way they also know what to do in the event of bullying which is not uncommon for him.

“I’ve been made fun of a lot. No one has done anything physical to me so I can’t do anything about it besides telling them to go away,” said Grzywacz.

Logan said he has learned to deal with the bullying. It isn’t something that happens to him every day, but it still happens.

“I feel like it’s starting more now instead of when I was younger,” said Grzywacz. “People like to underestimate me and say that I’m ‘weak’ or I can’t do things because of my height.”

He not only feels that students treat him differently, but that the school district has treated him differently as well. Logan said that the school district just doesn’t see how his disability truly affects him.

“It’s just frustrating. When I try to do something about my problems, I’m told to go to someone else. No one ever does anything,” said Grzywacz.   

Logan said that if the school district would do anything, all he would want them to do is talk to the person to make sure they understand the effect it has on him.

Despite his height deficiency and bullying issues, Grzywacz is in a regular gym class. He tends to struggle due to his exercise induced asthma and weaker leg muscles which causes his grade to fall a little bit.

He also struggles reaching things that are in higher places but acknowledges that GHD does give him some advantages.

“I’m able to get through small spaces and I have lots of friends that are there to back me up. When I’m in the hallways I can just scoot through small spaces and get anywhere I want.”

Logan enjoys spending his time working with other special needs students, which he has been doing since he was in sixth grade, and befriending the people around him. Logan said he is always listening and he said that he has heard a lot of things over the years, some nice and others not so nice.

“Please realize that a lot of things you say can have a very very big impact and be careful of a lot of things,” said Grzywacz. “Just because we are like this doesn’t mean it changes a lot of things or changes the way that other people should see us.”

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